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Passion fruit stimulates collagen production

Extracts from the seeds of Passiflora edulis, more commonly known as passion fruit, may be of interest to the manufacturers of cosmetic foods, and – who knows – also for the creators of joint-protection supplements. According to researchers at the Japanese food concern Morinaga, passion fruit extracts stimulate the production of collagen.

Extracts from the seeds of Passiflora edulis, more commonly known as passion fruit, may be of interest to the manufacturers of cosmetic foods, and – who knows – also for the creators of joint-protection supplements. According to researchers at the Japanese food concern Morinaga, passion fruit extracts stimulate the production of collagen.

Phenols in foods such as tea protect the skin by inhibiting the enzymes that break down collagen. [Planta Med. 2007 Oct;73(12):1267-74.] Tropical fruits like acai, passion fruit and mangosteen are full to bursting with phenols. The same tropical fruits are becoming more and more popular, as fruit, juices and processed products, especially among discerning rich consumers in developed countries.

This forms the context of the Japanese study, which was published in 2010 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In the study the researchers exposed human connective tissue cells [fibroblasts] to ethanol extracts of passion fruit. The extracts were made from the peel [circles], the fruit itself [triangles] or the seeds [squares] of the passion fruit.

To their delight the researchers saw that the extract made from passion fruit seeds boosted the synthesis of collagen.

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When the researchers analysed the composition of the active extract using chromatography, they observed that two polyphenols were present in large quantities: piceatannol [Peak 1] and resveratrol [Peak 2].

Piceatannol and resveratrol are closely related to each other. Piceatannol is created when enzymes attach an extra hydroxyl group to resveratrol.

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The researchers repeated their experiments with connective tissue cells. They discovered that piceatannol [circles] in particular, but also resveratrol [squares], stimulated the production of collagen. Extract made from all parts of passion fruit worked better, by the way.

“We postulate the possibility from our in vitro data that oral and topical application of Passiflora edulis seeds may contribute to a decrease in the skin damage, which leads to wrinkles and other skin abnormalities”, the researchers conclude. “However, additional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed for human application.”

If the results of further research are positive it may mean a new interesting and cheap raw material for the supplements industry. Passion fruit seeds cost almost nothing: juice manufacturers throw them away.

Extract of Passion Fruit ( Passiflora edulis ) Seed Containing High Amounts of Piceatannol Inhibits Melanogenesis and Promotes Collagen Synthesis.

Matsui Y, Sugiyama K, Kamei M, Takahashi T, Suzuki T, Katagata Y, Ito T.

Source

Research Institute, Morinaga and Company, Limited, 2-1-1 Shimosueyoshi, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-8504, Japan.

Abstract

The effect of passion fruit, the fruit of Passiflora edulis , on melanin inhibition and collagen synthesis was studied using cultured human melanoma and fibroblast cells. Passion fruit was divided into three parts, rind (PF-R), pulp (PF-P), and seed (PF-S), and each part was extracted using 80% ethanol. The concentration of polyphenols was higher in PF-S than in PF-R or PF-P. Treatment of melanoma cells with PF-S led to inhibition of melanogenesis. In addition, the production of total soluble collagen was elevated in dermal fibroblast cells cultured in the presence of PF-S. PF-R and PF-P did not yield these effects. Furthermore, the removal of polyphenols from PF-S led to the abolishment of the effects described above. We discovered that piceatannol (3,4,3′,5′-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene) is present in passion fruit seeds in large amounts and that this compound is the major component responsible for the PF-S effects observed on melanogenesis and collagen synthesis.

PMID: 20822151 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822151

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