United States Army issues Criminal Investigation Command memo on Steroids.com


United States Army issues Criminal Investigation Command memo on Steroids.com
by Anthony Roberts

The United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID), is a federal law enforcement agency that investigates crimes committed within the United States Army. This message was restricted to Law Enforcement Channels, and the following represents a redacted (and now suitable for civilian use) version of a memo sent out by the US Army CID:

1. (U//FOUO-LES) Use of Offense Code for Documenting ROIs Involving Anabolic Steroids – World Wide: On 20 Jul 10, CID Command standardizes the offense code series used in investigations involving anabolic steroids; when investigating anabolic steroids, the appropriate offense code series to use is 5L3 (Dangerous Drugs). In the past, some units used 5L3 (Dangerous Drugs) when categorizing investigations involving anabolic steroids, while other units used 5L5 [Other (Schedule IV or V)] (20 Jul 10, Fort Belvoir, Operational Memorandum 009-10).
(U//FOUO-LES) CID Analyst Comment: Anabolic steroids are one of the most abused controlled substances by US Soldiers. Soldiers are not only buying and selling steroids amongst themselves, but they are also purchasing steroids online from websites such as www.parabolan.org,www.steroids.com, www.isteroids.com, www.anabolic-pharma.com, andwww.parmaeurope.com. Anabolic steroids are a Schedule III controlled substance and are known to cause early heart attacks, strokes, liver tumors, kidney failure, and serious psychiatric problems.

The interesting thing about this memo is that they’re claiming that illegal steroids are being purchased from Steroids.com, one of Brian Clapp’s websites, while at the same time, Mr. Clapp is being allowed to advertise one of his companies (SteroidAlternatives.com) within the pages of Stars and Stripes, the United States Army’s official newspaper. A quick look at the banner for SteroidAlternatives.com tells us that it is “Steroids.com approved.”

I’d hope so, since he owns both sites. But a better question, and one that I’ll be asking the editors of this magazine later today, is why are they allowing a guy to advertise, when his company has been cited by the Criminal Investigation Command?

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